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in our backyard or in the field behind us. >> reporter: just before noon police caught one of the suspects. >> we did locate one subject hiding in an out building in an area where he was described to have fled. >> reporter: a rash of recent home invasions has neighbors here on edge. >> i think it is very scary especially when we have all these kids running around and playing and riding bikes. >> reporter: laura owns a daycare. >> came outside to see what was going on. and discovered all of this. >> did you send the kids home? >> no, but i have them locked up in my house and we keep coming out periodically to see what is going on. >> reporter: we are going to show you this surveillance video again. the neighbor didn't want to go on camera for obvious reasons because police are certainly looking at his videotape to try to catch these suspects. at this point right now two of the suspects are in custody. one of them is still at large. if you look at the videotape you can actually see the police car going down leeward street and then ramming into the jeep cherokee. the suspects
that is already melting down used plutonium. the white house is warning u.s. citizens to stay at least 50 miles away from that site, far more than the 20 miles japan is recommending. and millions have minimal food and water and are living in snowy and rainy conditions. more than 4300 are confirmed dead but officials believe that number will jump above 10,000. >>> another day of talk about a nuclear meltdown has touched off debate about radiation levels. now, most health experts agree that we have little to fear. simon perez has more on how people are exposed to radiation in their life every day. simon. >> reporter: dana, a lot of people are concerned about what is happening in japan and whether it could actually cross the pacific ocean and get here to california and the united states. but the fact of the matter is radiation is already here as you said exposed to it every day as you say. >> there is no way to avoid it. it is very small amounts. >> reporter: this radiation biologist says exposure comes from a variety of sources. >> flying in an airplane. increased radiation because of the altitud
million in structural damage. >>> the direction of the surge was pretty much had us in its, you know, sights. >> reporter: that plus the funnel shape of the harbor magnified the damage. >> as the waves migrated under the murray street bridge it became more of a standing wave. and that's where you seem some of the video that looks like actual surf taking out the docks and boats in the north harbor. once it reaps the end of the north harbor there is nowhere for that energy to go besides bouncing back. >> reporter: state emergency management officials toured the harbor by boat this morning. santa cruz and three other counties are already state disaster areas. state officials hope to make the case for getting federal disaster relief funds which could help the victims recover. >> the first step is to get it safe. the next step is to get it cleaned up. the next step after that is to get it restored. >> reporter: and it is a very long and difficult process. harbor officials here in santa cruz say they probably won't have the harbor open until probably the weekend. it could take longer. this
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3